Counties of Santa Barbara, Ventura and San Luis Obispo


About Us

Executive Committee
The nine member Executive Committee consists of three members from each county representing 1) local government, 2) sponsoring agencies, and 3) public members. The Executive Committee is elected annually among TCFT participants. For a list of current Executive Committee members, click here.

Participants
One of the main goals of the TCFT is to ensure that government agencies, special interest groups, and non-governmental organizations have equal opportunity to participate in the TCFT efforts. To date, 16 agencies and organizations have signed the TCFT MOU and a number of other groups actively participate in our regular public meetings. To view a list of TCFT participants and potential signatories to the MOU, click here.

Background
The Tri-County F.I.S.H. Team was founded in 2000 to increase the flow of salmonid restoration funding to the south-central California coastal counties of San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, and Ventura. In these three counties, steelhead are listed under the federal Endangered Species Act as threatened and endangered, but a relatively small percentage of statewide salmonid restoration dollars is targeted to projects from the tri-county area. During early discussions within the group, it became apparent that a regional group would be uniquely suited to providing additional benefits to the local restoration community. The Tri-County F.I.S.H. Team has worked over the last two years to organize itself, articulate the needs of local participants, and develop a framework for addressing these needs.

Based on the California Department of Fish and Game's (DFG) statewide assessment of current steelhead populations, it is clear that work to restore steelhead habitat is necessary if steelhead numbers are to recover. There are a large number of federal, state, and local agencies and organizations, both governmental and non-governmental, that are involved in steelhead restoration activities. Through coordination, these efforts can result in a greater benefit for fishery resources than each agency/organization acting alone.

A number of needs for successful fish restoration efforts have been identified within the area from San Luis Obispo county south to the Ventura area. Priority needs in the tri-county area include:

· identification of and coordination among local restoration and enhancement efforts,
· additional funding resources for restoration efforts;
· identification of regional and watershed-level restoration project priorities;
· additional staffing resources within state and federal agencies;
· increased public awareness and support for fishery restoration;
· improved understanding of scientific information for fishery management and of methods for designing successful restoration projects; and
· development of a recovery plan for the steelhead in the region.

The F.I.S.H. Team will work to address these needs and will be a resource in the region to the two resource agencies responsible for steelhead management (DFG and the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]).

Having a regional group that acts to foster coordination and communication among these more local entities can result in broader benefits for steelhead. By providing a forum for local groups to share information about who they are, what they do, and where they do it, duplication of efforts can be minimized. This leads to a better use of limited resources. In addition, effective communication and coordination can assist in this flow of expertise and experience in salmonid-related issues. In addition, local participants can share similar or successful experiences which can be replicated in other locations with minimal effort.